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ReliefWeb - Updates
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    Source: ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, War Child UK, Medair, International Relief and Development, INTERSOS, CARE, Handicap International, International Catholic Migration Commission, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, Relief International, HelpAge International, World Vision, Secours Islamique France, Première Urgence - Aide Médicale Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic

    Long-term vision and committed funding urgently needed from international community as flow of Syrian refugees continues

    The number of Syrian refugees will pass the two million mark within the next nine weeks*, a coalition of 19 aid agencies working in six countries directly affected by the Syrian crisis, warned today.

    Marking the UN’s World Refugee Day, the coalition said it was deeply concerned about the alarming escalation of refugee numbers, which is being fuelled by the relentless fighting in Syria.

    Hugh Fenton, Chair of the Syrian INGO Regional Forum, said: “The plight of Syrian refugees is on a staggering scale – and as the violence and bloodshed continue in Syria, the number of people fleeing the country rises uncontrollably.”

    “When they arrive in the host countries, refugees are bewildered and exhausted – not knowing what their future holds. A generation of Syrian children has witnessed brutal violence, women and girls have been victims of rape and abuses, and they will all continue to suffer while in exile.”

    “We must ensure that all those affected - registered or unregistered refugees, within and outside camps - receive the urgent assistance they need, and their basic needs for life are met.”

    The official number of Syrian refugees is rapidly growing above 1.6 million − with Lebanon and Jordan hosting the majority. But the official figures do not reflect the full picture and many thousands more are unregistered, lacking regular access to essential aid.

    Over 77% of the total refugee population are living in urban areas, outside official camps, with little or no opportunities to earn a living. While host country governments and communities and aid agencies are doing all they can to help, Syrian refugees need urgent access to basic services, including shelter, health, water and sanitation and education.

    The aid agencies warn that too many are trapped in a vicious cycle, finding it increasingly difficult to cope. High rental accommodation costs are driving many into debt or into inadequate shelter, exposing them and their families to health risks and further extreme stress.

    Healthcare facilities in overcrowded host communities are stretched to the limit. In Jordan, for example, the number of hospital visits by refugees grew from 300 per month in January 2012 to 10,000 visits this past March. In Lebanon, refugees are struggling to pay for their 25% share of hospitalisation.

    The aid agencies have called in vain for a sustained response to the refugee crisis – underlining the critical need for a long-term vision by the international community of how best to meet the needs of refugees and hosting communities.

    The current UN appeals (calling for over $4 billion) are less than a third funded and the aid agencies are urging donor countries to dig deep and find the money that is desperately needed to adequately fund the humanitarian response.

    Fenton said: “Of course a response on this scale is costly. But the lives of so many Syrians have been devastated. The international community cannot look the other way. Committed funds, not just pledges, are needed urgently.”

    “Refugees could be staying in host countries for months or years, it is critical that they are able to live with dignity and have livelihood options that help them to cover basic costs.”

    *Calculation is based on the average number of UNHCR’s registrations completed per week (https://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)

    Note to editors

    For more information, please contact:

    Adel Sarkozi, CARE: +962779967772, sarkozi@careinternational.org
    Ned Colt, IRC: +962775066652, Ned.Colt@rescue.org
    Iben de Neergaard, DRC: iben.de.neergaard@drc.dk
    Mike Bailey, World Vision International: +96273445410, mikerbailey@yahoo.com

    For interviews, please contact:

    Hugh Fenton, DRC, Chair of SIRF (English interviews): +962 796387798, +964 7819851830
    Thierry-Mehdi Benlahsen, Handicap International, board member of SIRF (French interviews): +961 70 84 02 43 or +962 7 871 955 96
    Magdi Ibrahim, Medecins du Monde (French interviews): +962 799276103
    Claire Seaward, Oxfam, board member of SIRF (English interviews): +962 776738595, +44 7827270724

    Syria INGO Regional Forum has members responding to the Syrian crisis in Syria and neighbouring countries. These include: ACTED, Action Aid, CARE, DRC, Handicap International, HelpAge International, ICMC, Intersos, IRC, IRD, Medair, Medecins du Monde, Oxfam, PU-AMI, Relief International, Secours Islamique France, Solidarités Internationale, War Child, World Vision International


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    Source: Catholic Agency for Overseas Development, ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, DanChurchAid, Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, War Child International, Medair, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, Lutheran World Federation, INTERSOS, CARE, Terre des hommes, Mercy Corps, Handicap International, Action Contre la Faim, International Catholic Migration Commission, Médecins du Monde, Mennonite Central Committee, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, Solidarités International, Oxfam, Life for Relief and Development, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, Relief International, Un Ponte per, HelpAge International, Save the Children, World Vision, Première Urgence - Aide Médicale Internationale, Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Syrian Arab Republic, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey

    Coalition of 36 international aid agencies calls on global donors to respond

    International aid agencies working in six countries to help people affected by the Syrian crisis today calls on the international community to dig deep and be generous in responding to the UN’s new Syria and refugee appeals.

    The Regional Response Plan (RRP6) and Syria Humanitarian Assistance Response Plan (SHARP) announced today in Geneva put under the spotlight the enormous need for immediate and substantive aid funding, members of the Syria INGO Regional Forum (SIRF) said today.

    The new UN appeal underlines how the humanitarian crisis has deteriorated in recent months, as the total amount sought far exceeds the previous $4.3 billion appeal launched last June. So far, donor response has not matched the scale of the humanitarian crisis. 62 per cent of the previous UN-led appeal has been funded, and while better than the typical response, it is not enough.

    SIRF’s Chairperson, Rob Drouen, said: “The last appeal broke the record of being the biggest appeal ever launched in UN history but that is left in the shade by today’s announcement.”

    “This money is urgently needed. The UN does not ask for this lightly. Now is the time for donors to step up and make sure that this appeal translates into actual commitments. We are at breaking point, and governments must act now,” added Drouen.

    The new appeal acknowledges the needs of urban refugees (those not in tented camps), who currently comprise close to 80 per cent of the entire refugee population, and have little or no access to income. “There are staggering emergency needs, but we must find solutions to meet the requirements of refugee children and families, as well as overburdened host communities. An urgent political solution to the crisis is needed,” said SIRF board member, Dina Morad.

    SIRF stresses that the international community has to support development initiatives in the areas of health and education, as well as water and energy supplies – both for refugees and host communities. SIRF welcomes the fact that the new appeal includes the support of host communities. Neighbouring countries have been extremely generous hosts, but their capacities and resources have been severely strained. “The generosity of host countries in the region must be recognized and commended,” says Morad. “Without their hospitality, the humanitarian impact of the crisis would be even more devastating.” Syrians now comprise the world’s second largest refugee population. There are more than 2.3 million people struggling to survive in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq, Egypt and beyond with that figure expected to rise substantially by the end of 2014. Most have exhausted all their resources. Increasing rental and food costs and medical expenses are driving families into debt, exposing them to health risks and emotional trauma. 

    Even more bleak and expansive is the humanitarian crisis inside Syria, where millions in need of aid are receiving limited or no assistance, and are forced to move multiple times in search of safety. Aid access to much of Syria is limited due to many reasons including constantly shifting lines of control.

    SIRF calls on all donors to commit funds to address the growing needs of crisis-affected Syrians wherever they may be. The Forum also urges the international community to ensure that humanitarian access is granted, and that aid is strictly impartial, delivered on the basis of humanitarian principles, and is inclusive of the needs of all groups. These groups include many others affected by the crisis, such as Palestinian and Iraqi populations.

    The appeal underscores the urgent need for an end to the crisis. Already, more than 100,000 have lost their lives; at least 7,000 of those killed are children. SIRF calls on all parties to work to find a political solution to the conflict.

    For more information, please contact:

    Ned Colt, The International Rescue Committee, Amman: Ned.Colt@rescue.org +962 775 066652 Johanna Mitscherlich, CARE International, Amman: Johanna.Mitscherlich@jo.care.org +962 775 442241 Logan Sullivan, Handicap International, Beirut: off.region@hi-emergency.org +961 793 13907

    For interviews, please contact:

    Rob Drouen, SIRF Chair and ACF Regional Representative Middle East, Mobile: +962 (0) 775 180672 Dina Morad, SIRF Board Member and Policy Advisor for Mercy Corps: +962 77 606 0085 Sarah Case, SIRF Board Member and IRC Regional Advocacy Officer: +962 775 090799 Gaia van der Esch, SIRF Board Member and ACTED Regional Project Development Manager: +962 796017682 Gareth Richards, Regional Director CARE Middle East and North Africa, Mobile: +20 1223 987 329


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    Source: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Première Urgence - Aide Médicale Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic

    1.1. HUMANITARIAN CONTEXT

    1.1.1. General Humanitarian context

    Jordan is the country hosting the second largest number of Syrian refugees, with 567,1111 refugees in early December 2013, after Lebanon (838,189 refugees); the other countries hosting refugees are Turkey (540,350 refugees), Iraq (207,053 refugees) and Egypt (129,486 refugees). In Jordan, the first response to the needs of the refugees was carried out by the host communities alongside Jordan civil society and charity organizations. However, the constant influx of people put significant strains on the already weak economic situation of the Jordanian population in the areas of refuge. Even though Jordan has a long history of hosting refugee populations, the current Syrian influx overstretches the capacity of the country. The number of Syrian refugees is actually increasing at a higher rate than what was plan for by the international community; the number of Syrian refugees by the end of the year was expected to be 360,000 in the January response plan prepared by the GoJ.

    At a regional level, the exodus of Syrian refugees has dramatically accelerated in recent months, with over 1 million refugees arriving in the first five months of 2013 alone. More than half of registered refugees are children and three quarters of registered refugees are living with local communities. If current trends persist, it can be expected that over 3 million Syrians would have fled their country by the end of 2013. It is worth mentioning that new arrivals have been unusually low since May, despite continued fighting along the border.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Première Urgence - Aide Médicale Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic

    Mission

    PU-AMI is a not-for-profit, non-political and non-religious NGO. Established in April 2011 from the mer-ger of two French NG0s— Premiere Urgence (formed in 1992) and Aide Medicale Internationale (formed in 1979).

    PU-AMI relies on 34 years of field experience in fifty crisis-affected countries, adapting its pro-grammes to every context and to the most vulnerable populations' needs. Present in the Middle East since 1996, PU-AMI is currently operational in Iraq (including Iraqi Kurdistan), Lebanon, Syria, the Occu-pied Palestinian Territory, Yemen, Egypt and Jordan. A regional office supports the missions from Amman, Jordan.

    Its objective is to bring about a global response to the basic needs of populations suffering from acute humanitarian crisis and to allow them to recover their autonomy and dignity.

    PU-AMI's principles are neutrality and impartiality, non-discrimination, respect of communities, transparency and independence.

    PU-AMI's team has been working in Jordan since October 2013, in Am-man and Zarqa governorates, as part of a joint effort with ECHO. PU-AMI implements projects covering the upgrading of housing through sealing-off kit distribution. PU-AMI also coordinates a referral system for a better coverage of the population's needs.

    In 2014, PU-AMI has appealed for a total of USD 3,560,000


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Première Urgence - Aide Médicale Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic

    Mission

    PU-AMI is a not-for-profit, non-political and non-religious NGO. Established in April 2011 from the mer-ger of two French NGOs— Première Urgence (formed in 1992) and Aide Médicale Internationale (formed in 1979).

    PU-AMI relies on 34 years of field experience in fifty crisis-affected countries, adapting its pro-grammes to every context and to the most vulnerable populations’ needs. Present in the Middle East since 1996, PU-AMI is currently operational in Iraq (including Iraqi Kurdistan), Lebanon, Syria, the Occu-pied Palestinian Territory, Yemen, Egypt and Jordan. A regional office supports the missions from Amman, Jordan.

    Its objective is to bring about a global response to the basic needs of populations suffering from acute humanitarian crisis and to allow them to recover their autonomy and dignity. PU-AMI’s principles are neutrality and impartiality, non-discrimination, respect of communities, transparency and independence.

    PU-AMI’s team has been working in Jordan since October 2013, in Am-man, Zarqa, Jerash and Balqa governorates, as part of a joint effort with ECHO. PU-AMI provides assistance in the Shelter (Distribution of Sealing-off Kits) and Cash (Urgent Cash Assistance). Funded by the CDC, PU-AMI also implements activities in the protection sectors (legal assistance, information on existing services and referral in community centers). PU-AMI also coordi-nates a referral system for a better coverage of the population’s needs.

    After the RRP6 Mid-Year Review, in 2014, PU-AMI has appealed for a revised total of USD 2,880,945


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    Source: ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, Amnesty International, Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, Medair, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, CARE, Caritas, Handicap International, Action Contre la Faim, European Council on Refugees and Exiles, Médecins du Monde, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, Un Ponte per, Qatar Red Crescent Society, Muslim Aid, Save the Children, Première Urgence - Aide Médicale Internationale, Support to Life
    Country: Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, occupied Palestinian territory, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey

    Humanitarian and human rights agencies urge governments to resettle 5% refugees from Syria by end 2015

    Over 30 international organisations are calling on governments meeting in Geneva tomorrow to commit to offering sanctuary to at least 5 per cent of the most vulnerable refugees from Syria currently in neighbouring countries - 180,000 people - by the end of 2015.

    The governments convened by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) will be making pledges to resettle or provide other forms of humanitarian admission to Syrian refugees. Up to 3.59 million people are projected to have fled the conflict into countries neighbouring Syria by the end of this year. To date the international community has pledged to resettle less than 2 per cent of this number over an unclear timeframe.

    Syria’s neighbouring countries have shown incredible generosity over the last three and a half years, but the strain of the crisis is weighing heavily on infrastructure and public services. Turkey and Lebanon each host more than 1 million registered refugees. One in every four residents in Lebanon is a refugee from Syria. Jordan hosts more than 618,000 and Iraq hosts 225,000 (on top of millions of internally displaced Iraqis). With diminishing resources, refugees and host communities are paying the price, as well as those still trying to flee the conflict in Syria as neighbouring countries restrict and effectively close their borders.

    “The situation for the most vulnerable refugees from Syria is becoming increasingly desperate. Some – including sick children, who without treatment, could die - are simply unable to survive in the region. Providing humanitarian aid alone is no longer an option: it’s time for wealthy governments to step up and extend a lifeline to 5 per cent of the refugee population by the end of 2015,” said Justin Forsyth, CEO of Save the Children.

    “This is one of the worst refugee crises since World War II, displacing millions of civilians, mostly women and children,” said Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International. “We’re counting on governments in Geneva to move quickly to demonstrate the kind of international solidarity that is desperately needed to transform the lives of the most vulnerable refugees.”

    While 5 per cent is only a small fraction of the total number of refugees, it would mean the hope of a better future and safety for at least 180,000 people by the end of next year, including survivors of torture, those with significant medical needs, children and women at risk – as identified by the UN refugee agency. Accepting the most vulnerable cases for resettlement or humanitarian admission also relieves Syria’s neighbouring countries from the short term costs of treating, supporting or protecting them.

    Resettlement pledge

    “With the collapse in the international solidarity, Syria’s neighbours are now increasing their border restrictions. Desperate Syrian civilians are unable to escape the war. Wealthy countries need to scale up their resettlement pledges and at the same time increase the support to the region so that borders are kept open,” said Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council Jan Egeland.

    “Just because we happen to share no border with Syria, this does not free any of us from responsibility”.

    The coalition of NGOs are also calling on states that have not traditionally participated in refugee resettlement, such as countries in the Gulf and Latin America, to join other states by pledging resettlement and humanitarian admission places. Beyond this, governments can also do much more through innovative ways to help refugees from Syria in 2015, such as through making available work permits and university places, while offering them full protections in line with the 1951 Refugee Convention.

    Notes to editors

    The full brief adopted by the organisations listed below is available: Resettlement of Refugees from Syria: Increased commitments needed from international community in Geneva

    ABAAD (Liban)

    ACTED

    ACTIONAID

    ACTION CONTRE LA FAIM

    AMEL (Liban)

    AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

    ASSOCIATION EUROPÉENNE POUR LA DÉFENSE DES DROITS DE L’HOMME

    CONSEIL BRITANNIQUE POUR LES RÉFUGIÉS

    CARE INTERNATIONAL

    CARITAS

    CENTRE FOR REFUGEE SOLIDARITY

    CHILDRENPLUS

    CIVIL SOCIETY IN PENETENTIARY SYSTEMS (Turquie)

    CONSEIL DANOIS POUR LES RÉFUGIÉS

    RÉSEAU EURO-MÉDITERRANÉEN DES DROITS DE L’HOMME

    CONSEIL EUROPÉEN SUR LES RÉFUGIÉS ET LES EXILÉS

    FRONTIERS RUWAD (Liban)

    HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL

    HUMAN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION (Turquie)

    THE INTERNATIONAL RESCUE COMMITTEE

    ISLAMIC RELIEF

    JREDS (Jordanie)

    CENTRE LIBANAIS DES DROITS HUMAINS

    LIGUE DES DROITS DE L'HOMME

    MÉDECINS DU MONDE

    MEDAIR

    MUSLIM AID

    CONSEIL NORVÉGIEN POUR LES RÉFUGIÉS

    OXFAM

    PREMIERE URGENCE- AIDE MÉDICALE INTERNATIONALE

    QATAR RED CRESCENT

    SAVE THE CHILDREN

    SAWA FOR DEVELOPMENT AND AID (Liban)

    SUPPORT TO LIFE (Turquie)

    SYRIA INGO REGIONAL FORUM

    UN PONTE PER

    Contact information

    Lebanon: Joelle Bassoul, Syria Response Media Advisor, Oxfam, jbassoul@oxfam.org.uk, +961-71525218

    Jordan: Karl Schembri, Regional Media Manager, Save the Children, karl.schembri@savethechildren.org, +962 (0) 7902 20159

    US: Oliver Money, Media Relations, International Rescue Committee, oliver.money@rescue.org, +1-646 318 7307

    UK: Sara Hashash, MENA Press Officer, Amnesty International, Sara.hashash@amnesty.org, + 44 (0) 20 7413 5511


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    Source: Danish Refugee Council, Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development, UN Population Fund, Islamic Relief, International Organization for Migration, International Relief and Development, Norwegian Refugee Council, INTERSOS, CARE, UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, Terre des hommes, World Food Programme, Mercy Corps, UN Children's Fund, International Catholic Migration Commission, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, Un Ponte per, Save the Children, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, World Vision, Terre des hommes Italia, UN Women, Première Urgence Internationale, Jordan Health Aid Society
    Country: Jordan

    Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA)

    Sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) violates universally recognized international legal norms and standards and has always been unacceptable behavior and prohibited conduct for humanitarian workers. It brings harm to those whom the UN and humanitarian agencies are mandated to protect, and jeopardizes the reputation of these agencies and their ability to provide protection.

    Sexual exploitation and abuse is not a new phenomenon. In 2001, the UNHCR/Save the Children assessment1 highlighted how international and national aid workers, working for Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and United Nations (UN) agencies were perpetrators of gross misconduct in West African refugee camps. The aid workers abused their roles as decision-makers and their positions of trust, to sexually exploit and abuse beneficiary populations. Humanitarian workers traded items, as seemingly insignificant as biscuits, in exchange for sex with women and children.

    The shocking findings of the assessment highlighted both the vulnerability of such populations and that humanitarian and development agencies have an obligation to put in place organisational and programmatic systems that protect those we serve, and that we do not inadvertently recruit potential perpetrators. It also highlighted that we need to put in place complaints mechanisms so that alleged cases can be raised and reported; investigated; and, where necessary, referred to the authorities where a crime is suspected.

    The findings resulted in the establishment of the Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Taskforce on Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA), which advised the UN on specific measures and adopted six standards of behaviour (core principles) to be included in the UN Secretary General’s Bulletin: Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) (SGB)2 (Annex I) which is based on the UN’s Code of Conduct and applies to all UN Staff, partners and contractors. As a further expression of intent and will to act, the Statement of Commitment on Eliminating Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN and Non-UN Personnel (2006)3 (Annex II), is endorsed by 42 UN agencies and 36 Non-UN entities (as of 2008), binding all signatories to the Core Principles and prevention measures as outlined in the SGB.

    Despite efforts to establish systems and mechanisms to facilitate reports, underreporting of sexual exploitation and abuse remains a challenge for the humanitarian community. Several reports researching the issue (i.e. No One To Turn To, 20084; To Complain or Not To Complain, 20105) have concluded that sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarian personnel is chronically underreported. Several factors explain this including: fear of losing muchneeded material assistance; fear of stigmatization; the threat of retribution or retaliation; the lack of knowledge on how to report an allegation of sexual exploitation and abuse; vulnerable groups feeling powerless to report an abuse; lack of effective legal services to which cases of abuse can be reported; lack of faith in the response that an allegation of sexual abuse would receive; cultural barriers to reporting sexual exploitation and abuse; fear of the consequences of mandatory reporting requirements and lack of maintaining confidentiality.


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    Source: Catholic Agency for Overseas Development, Danish Refugee Council, Trócaire, Lutheran World Federation, CARE, Christian Aid, Mercy Corps, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, HelpAge International, Save the Children, World Vision, Diakonia Sweden, Dorcas Aid International, Terre des hommes Italia, Secours Islamique France, Finn Church Aid, Première Urgence Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey

    Refugees face similar challenges across Syria’s neighbouring countries

    Refugees face similar challenges across Syria’s neighbouring countries, a new report by a coalition of 28 NGOs has found, warning that long-term efforts are still needed by the international community and host governments.

    Released against the backdrop of the “Supporting Syrians and the Region Conference” in Helsinki, slated for January 24, the report looked at changes in the legal status, education and jobs conditions of Syrians in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon one year after the London conference, which presented a “comprehensive new approach” to addressing the protracted Syrian crisis in February 2016.

    “We urge the international community to ensure that the generous commitments made last year mark a new era of collaboration, solidarity and responsibility sharing to respond to the needs of Syrian refugees, internally displaced and host communities,” says Gerry Garvey, Regional Director for the Danish Refugee Council in Middle East and North Africa.

    Since the beginning of the conflict, more than 4.8 million have fled Syria to its neighbouring countries, while UN numbers show more than 9 million inside Syria in urgent need of assistance. At last year’s conference, donors committed to longer term funding while host governments committed to significant policy changes. The new report from the Danish Refugee Council (DRC) and 27 other organisations takes stock of the progress on these commitments.

    “While important steps have been taken, much more remains unaccomplished — not least when it comes to witnessing a measurable and sustainable impact on people’s lives. There is a continued need for more predictable and equitable responsibility sharing for refugees,” Gerry Garvey says.

    Relevant government actors, UN, INGOs and Syrian NGOs will meet in Helsinki to follow up on the situation for Syrian refugees in the region. At the London conference, donors had pledged $6 billion for 2016. By September 2016, over $6.3 billion had been committed in grants for 2016, exceeding pledges by 5%. However, there is still room for progress. One of the aspirations of the London conference was to generate long-term funding commitments. While $6.1 billion was pledged for 2017-2020, currently only $607.9 million has been committed.

    “One of the successes of the London Conference was the recognition that humanitarian aid alone is not an adequate response to the massive crisis inside Syria and the strains placed on refugee hosting countries. But at the same time, we've seen an increasingly restrictive environment for refugees emerge across many countries since the London Conference, including in Europe and the US. Globally, we currently witness a lack of resettlement opportunities. And with continued closed borders of many of the neighbouring countries, this is part of a global situation where Syrians risk being caught inside their war torn homeland,” says Gerry Garvey

    Read the report here

    The Danish Refugee Council is one of the largest organisations working with the Syrian displaced. With multi-sector programmes covering both humanitarian and development needs inside Syria as well as neighbouring countries, including Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Turkey, DRC is a central actor in the response to the protracted Syrian crisis. DRC Secretary General, Andreas Kamm and Regional Director for MENA; Gerry Garvey will participate in the Helsinki conference.


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    Source: ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, War Child UK, Medair, International Relief and Development, INTERSOS, CARE, Handicap International, International Catholic Migration Commission, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, Relief International, HelpAge International, World Vision, Secours Islamique France, Première Urgence Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic

    Long-term vision and committed funding urgently needed from international community as flow of Syrian refugees continues

    The number of Syrian refugees will pass the two million mark within the next nine weeks*, a coalition of 19 aid agencies working in six countries directly affected by the Syrian crisis, warned today.

    Marking the UN’s World Refugee Day, the coalition said it was deeply concerned about the alarming escalation of refugee numbers, which is being fuelled by the relentless fighting in Syria.

    Hugh Fenton, Chair of the Syrian INGO Regional Forum, said: “The plight of Syrian refugees is on a staggering scale – and as the violence and bloodshed continue in Syria, the number of people fleeing the country rises uncontrollably.”

    “When they arrive in the host countries, refugees are bewildered and exhausted – not knowing what their future holds. A generation of Syrian children has witnessed brutal violence, women and girls have been victims of rape and abuses, and they will all continue to suffer while in exile.”

    “We must ensure that all those affected - registered or unregistered refugees, within and outside camps - receive the urgent assistance they need, and their basic needs for life are met.”

    The official number of Syrian refugees is rapidly growing above 1.6 million − with Lebanon and Jordan hosting the majority. But the official figures do not reflect the full picture and many thousands more are unregistered, lacking regular access to essential aid.

    Over 77% of the total refugee population are living in urban areas, outside official camps, with little or no opportunities to earn a living. While host country governments and communities and aid agencies are doing all they can to help, Syrian refugees need urgent access to basic services, including shelter, health, water and sanitation and education.

    The aid agencies warn that too many are trapped in a vicious cycle, finding it increasingly difficult to cope. High rental accommodation costs are driving many into debt or into inadequate shelter, exposing them and their families to health risks and further extreme stress.

    Healthcare facilities in overcrowded host communities are stretched to the limit. In Jordan, for example, the number of hospital visits by refugees grew from 300 per month in January 2012 to 10,000 visits this past March. In Lebanon, refugees are struggling to pay for their 25% share of hospitalisation.

    The aid agencies have called in vain for a sustained response to the refugee crisis – underlining the critical need for a long-term vision by the international community of how best to meet the needs of refugees and hosting communities.

    The current UN appeals (calling for over $4 billion) are less than a third funded and the aid agencies are urging donor countries to dig deep and find the money that is desperately needed to adequately fund the humanitarian response.

    Fenton said: “Of course a response on this scale is costly. But the lives of so many Syrians have been devastated. The international community cannot look the other way. Committed funds, not just pledges, are needed urgently.”

    “Refugees could be staying in host countries for months or years, it is critical that they are able to live with dignity and have livelihood options that help them to cover basic costs.”

    *Calculation is based on the average number of UNHCR’s registrations completed per week (https://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)

    Note to editors

    For more information, please contact:

    Adel Sarkozi, CARE: +962779967772, sarkozi@careinternational.org
    Ned Colt, IRC: +962775066652, Ned.Colt@rescue.org
    Iben de Neergaard, DRC: iben.de.neergaard@drc.dk
    Mike Bailey, World Vision International: +96273445410, mikerbailey@yahoo.com

    For interviews, please contact:

    Hugh Fenton, DRC, Chair of SIRF (English interviews): +962 796387798, +964 7819851830
    Thierry-Mehdi Benlahsen, Handicap International, board member of SIRF (French interviews): +961 70 84 02 43 or +962 7 871 955 96
    Magdi Ibrahim, Medecins du Monde (French interviews): +962 799276103
    Claire Seaward, Oxfam, board member of SIRF (English interviews): +962 776738595, +44 7827270724

    Syria INGO Regional Forum has members responding to the Syrian crisis in Syria and neighbouring countries. These include: ACTED, Action Aid, CARE, DRC, Handicap International, HelpAge International, ICMC, Intersos, IRC, IRD, Medair, Medecins du Monde, Oxfam, PU-AMI, Relief International, Secours Islamique France, Solidarités Internationale, War Child, World Vision International


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    Source: Catholic Agency for Overseas Development, ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, DanChurchAid, ACTED, War Child International, Medair, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, Lutheran World Federation, INTERSOS, CARE, Terre des hommes, Mercy Corps, Handicap International, Action Contre la Faim France, International Catholic Migration Commission, Médecins du Monde, Mennonite Central Committee, International Council of Voluntary Agencies, Solidarités International, Oxfam, Life for Relief and Development, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, Relief International, Un Ponte per, HelpAge International, Save the Children, World Vision, Première Urgence Internationale, Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Syrian Arab Republic, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey

    Coalition of 36 international aid agencies calls on global donors to respond

    International aid agencies working in six countries to help people affected by the Syrian crisis today calls on the international community to dig deep and be generous in responding to the UN’s new Syria and refugee appeals.

    The Regional Response Plan (RRP6) and Syria Humanitarian Assistance Response Plan (SHARP) announced today in Geneva put under the spotlight the enormous need for immediate and substantive aid funding, members of the Syria INGO Regional Forum (SIRF) said today.

    The new UN appeal underlines how the humanitarian crisis has deteriorated in recent months, as the total amount sought far exceeds the previous $4.3 billion appeal launched last June. So far, donor response has not matched the scale of the humanitarian crisis. 62 per cent of the previous UN-led appeal has been funded, and while better than the typical response, it is not enough.

    SIRF’s Chairperson, Rob Drouen, said: “The last appeal broke the record of being the biggest appeal ever launched in UN history but that is left in the shade by today’s announcement.”

    “This money is urgently needed. The UN does not ask for this lightly. Now is the time for donors to step up and make sure that this appeal translates into actual commitments. We are at breaking point, and governments must act now,” added Drouen.

    The new appeal acknowledges the needs of urban refugees (those not in tented camps), who currently comprise close to 80 per cent of the entire refugee population, and have little or no access to income. “There are staggering emergency needs, but we must find solutions to meet the requirements of refugee children and families, as well as overburdened host communities. An urgent political solution to the crisis is needed,” said SIRF board member, Dina Morad.

    SIRF stresses that the international community has to support development initiatives in the areas of health and education, as well as water and energy supplies – both for refugees and host communities. SIRF welcomes the fact that the new appeal includes the support of host communities. Neighbouring countries have been extremely generous hosts, but their capacities and resources have been severely strained. “The generosity of host countries in the region must be recognized and commended,” says Morad. “Without their hospitality, the humanitarian impact of the crisis would be even more devastating.” Syrians now comprise the world’s second largest refugee population. There are more than 2.3 million people struggling to survive in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, Iraq, Egypt and beyond with that figure expected to rise substantially by the end of 2014. Most have exhausted all their resources. Increasing rental and food costs and medical expenses are driving families into debt, exposing them to health risks and emotional trauma. 

    Even more bleak and expansive is the humanitarian crisis inside Syria, where millions in need of aid are receiving limited or no assistance, and are forced to move multiple times in search of safety. Aid access to much of Syria is limited due to many reasons including constantly shifting lines of control.

    SIRF calls on all donors to commit funds to address the growing needs of crisis-affected Syrians wherever they may be. The Forum also urges the international community to ensure that humanitarian access is granted, and that aid is strictly impartial, delivered on the basis of humanitarian principles, and is inclusive of the needs of all groups. These groups include many others affected by the crisis, such as Palestinian and Iraqi populations.

    The appeal underscores the urgent need for an end to the crisis. Already, more than 100,000 have lost their lives; at least 7,000 of those killed are children. SIRF calls on all parties to work to find a political solution to the conflict.

    For more information, please contact:

    Ned Colt, The International Rescue Committee, Amman: Ned.Colt@rescue.org +962 775 066652 Johanna Mitscherlich, CARE International, Amman: Johanna.Mitscherlich@jo.care.org +962 775 442241 Logan Sullivan, Handicap International, Beirut: off.region@hi-emergency.org +961 793 13907

    For interviews, please contact:

    Rob Drouen, SIRF Chair and ACF Regional Representative Middle East, Mobile: +962 (0) 775 180672 Dina Morad, SIRF Board Member and Policy Advisor for Mercy Corps: +962 77 606 0085 Sarah Case, SIRF Board Member and IRC Regional Advocacy Officer: +962 775 090799 Gaia van der Esch, SIRF Board Member and ACTED Regional Project Development Manager: +962 796017682 Gareth Richards, Regional Director CARE Middle East and North Africa, Mobile: +20 1223 987 329


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    Source: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Première Urgence Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic

    1.1. HUMANITARIAN CONTEXT

    1.1.1. General Humanitarian context

    Jordan is the country hosting the second largest number of Syrian refugees, with 567,1111 refugees in early December 2013, after Lebanon (838,189 refugees); the other countries hosting refugees are Turkey (540,350 refugees), Iraq (207,053 refugees) and Egypt (129,486 refugees). In Jordan, the first response to the needs of the refugees was carried out by the host communities alongside Jordan civil society and charity organizations. However, the constant influx of people put significant strains on the already weak economic situation of the Jordanian population in the areas of refuge. Even though Jordan has a long history of hosting refugee populations, the current Syrian influx overstretches the capacity of the country. The number of Syrian refugees is actually increasing at a higher rate than what was plan for by the international community; the number of Syrian refugees by the end of the year was expected to be 360,000 in the January response plan prepared by the GoJ.

    At a regional level, the exodus of Syrian refugees has dramatically accelerated in recent months, with over 1 million refugees arriving in the first five months of 2013 alone. More than half of registered refugees are children and three quarters of registered refugees are living with local communities. If current trends persist, it can be expected that over 3 million Syrians would have fled their country by the end of 2013. It is worth mentioning that new arrivals have been unusually low since May, despite continued fighting along the border.


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Première Urgence Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic

    Mission

    PU-AMI is a not-for-profit, non-political and non-religious NGO. Established in April 2011 from the mer-ger of two French NG0s— Premiere Urgence (formed in 1992) and Aide Medicale Internationale (formed in 1979).

    PU-AMI relies on 34 years of field experience in fifty crisis-affected countries, adapting its pro-grammes to every context and to the most vulnerable populations' needs. Present in the Middle East since 1996, PU-AMI is currently operational in Iraq (including Iraqi Kurdistan), Lebanon, Syria, the Occu-pied Palestinian Territory, Yemen, Egypt and Jordan. A regional office supports the missions from Amman, Jordan.

    Its objective is to bring about a global response to the basic needs of populations suffering from acute humanitarian crisis and to allow them to recover their autonomy and dignity.

    PU-AMI's principles are neutrality and impartiality, non-discrimination, respect of communities, transparency and independence.

    PU-AMI's team has been working in Jordan since October 2013, in Am-man and Zarqa governorates, as part of a joint effort with ECHO. PU-AMI implements projects covering the upgrading of housing through sealing-off kit distribution. PU-AMI also coordinates a referral system for a better coverage of the population's needs.

    In 2014, PU-AMI has appealed for a total of USD 3,560,000


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    Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Première Urgence Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic

    Mission

    PU-AMI is a not-for-profit, non-political and non-religious NGO. Established in April 2011 from the mer-ger of two French NGOs— Première Urgence (formed in 1992) and Aide Médicale Internationale (formed in 1979).

    PU-AMI relies on 34 years of field experience in fifty crisis-affected countries, adapting its pro-grammes to every context and to the most vulnerable populations’ needs. Present in the Middle East since 1996, PU-AMI is currently operational in Iraq (including Iraqi Kurdistan), Lebanon, Syria, the Occu-pied Palestinian Territory, Yemen, Egypt and Jordan. A regional office supports the missions from Amman, Jordan.

    Its objective is to bring about a global response to the basic needs of populations suffering from acute humanitarian crisis and to allow them to recover their autonomy and dignity. PU-AMI’s principles are neutrality and impartiality, non-discrimination, respect of communities, transparency and independence.

    PU-AMI’s team has been working in Jordan since October 2013, in Am-man, Zarqa, Jerash and Balqa governorates, as part of a joint effort with ECHO. PU-AMI provides assistance in the Shelter (Distribution of Sealing-off Kits) and Cash (Urgent Cash Assistance). Funded by the CDC, PU-AMI also implements activities in the protection sectors (legal assistance, information on existing services and referral in community centers). PU-AMI also coordi-nates a referral system for a better coverage of the population’s needs.

    After the RRP6 Mid-Year Review, in 2014, PU-AMI has appealed for a revised total of USD 2,880,945


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    Source: ActionAid, Danish Refugee Council, Amnesty International, ACTED, Medair, Islamic Relief, Norwegian Refugee Council, CARE, Caritas, Handicap International, Action Contre la Faim France, European Council on Refugees and Exiles, Médecins du Monde, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, Un Ponte per, Qatar Red Crescent Society, Muslim Aid, Save the Children, Première Urgence Internationale, Support to Life
    Country: Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, occupied Palestinian territory, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey

    Humanitarian and human rights agencies urge governments to resettle 5% refugees from Syria by end 2015

    Over 30 international organisations are calling on governments meeting in Geneva tomorrow to commit to offering sanctuary to at least 5 per cent of the most vulnerable refugees from Syria currently in neighbouring countries - 180,000 people - by the end of 2015.

    The governments convened by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) will be making pledges to resettle or provide other forms of humanitarian admission to Syrian refugees. Up to 3.59 million people are projected to have fled the conflict into countries neighbouring Syria by the end of this year. To date the international community has pledged to resettle less than 2 per cent of this number over an unclear timeframe.

    Syria’s neighbouring countries have shown incredible generosity over the last three and a half years, but the strain of the crisis is weighing heavily on infrastructure and public services. Turkey and Lebanon each host more than 1 million registered refugees. One in every four residents in Lebanon is a refugee from Syria. Jordan hosts more than 618,000 and Iraq hosts 225,000 (on top of millions of internally displaced Iraqis). With diminishing resources, refugees and host communities are paying the price, as well as those still trying to flee the conflict in Syria as neighbouring countries restrict and effectively close their borders.

    “The situation for the most vulnerable refugees from Syria is becoming increasingly desperate. Some – including sick children, who without treatment, could die - are simply unable to survive in the region. Providing humanitarian aid alone is no longer an option: it’s time for wealthy governments to step up and extend a lifeline to 5 per cent of the refugee population by the end of 2015,” said Justin Forsyth, CEO of Save the Children.

    “This is one of the worst refugee crises since World War II, displacing millions of civilians, mostly women and children,” said Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International. “We’re counting on governments in Geneva to move quickly to demonstrate the kind of international solidarity that is desperately needed to transform the lives of the most vulnerable refugees.”

    While 5 per cent is only a small fraction of the total number of refugees, it would mean the hope of a better future and safety for at least 180,000 people by the end of next year, including survivors of torture, those with significant medical needs, children and women at risk – as identified by the UN refugee agency. Accepting the most vulnerable cases for resettlement or humanitarian admission also relieves Syria’s neighbouring countries from the short term costs of treating, supporting or protecting them.

    Resettlement pledge

    “With the collapse in the international solidarity, Syria’s neighbours are now increasing their border restrictions. Desperate Syrian civilians are unable to escape the war. Wealthy countries need to scale up their resettlement pledges and at the same time increase the support to the region so that borders are kept open,” said Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council Jan Egeland.

    “Just because we happen to share no border with Syria, this does not free any of us from responsibility”.

    The coalition of NGOs are also calling on states that have not traditionally participated in refugee resettlement, such as countries in the Gulf and Latin America, to join other states by pledging resettlement and humanitarian admission places. Beyond this, governments can also do much more through innovative ways to help refugees from Syria in 2015, such as through making available work permits and university places, while offering them full protections in line with the 1951 Refugee Convention.

    Notes to editors

    The full brief adopted by the organisations listed below is available: Resettlement of Refugees from Syria: Increased commitments needed from international community in Geneva

    ABAAD (Liban)

    ACTED

    ACTIONAID

    ACTION CONTRE LA FAIM

    AMEL (Liban)

    AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

    ASSOCIATION EUROPÉENNE POUR LA DÉFENSE DES DROITS DE L’HOMME

    CONSEIL BRITANNIQUE POUR LES RÉFUGIÉS

    CARE INTERNATIONAL

    CARITAS

    CENTRE FOR REFUGEE SOLIDARITY

    CHILDRENPLUS

    CIVIL SOCIETY IN PENETENTIARY SYSTEMS (Turquie)

    CONSEIL DANOIS POUR LES RÉFUGIÉS

    RÉSEAU EURO-MÉDITERRANÉEN DES DROITS DE L’HOMME

    CONSEIL EUROPÉEN SUR LES RÉFUGIÉS ET LES EXILÉS

    FRONTIERS RUWAD (Liban)

    HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL

    HUMAN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION (Turquie)

    THE INTERNATIONAL RESCUE COMMITTEE

    ISLAMIC RELIEF

    JREDS (Jordanie)

    CENTRE LIBANAIS DES DROITS HUMAINS

    LIGUE DES DROITS DE L'HOMME

    MÉDECINS DU MONDE

    MEDAIR

    MUSLIM AID

    CONSEIL NORVÉGIEN POUR LES RÉFUGIÉS

    OXFAM

    PREMIERE URGENCE- AIDE MÉDICALE INTERNATIONALE

    QATAR RED CRESCENT

    SAVE THE CHILDREN

    SAWA FOR DEVELOPMENT AND AID (Liban)

    SUPPORT TO LIFE (Turquie)

    SYRIA INGO REGIONAL FORUM

    UN PONTE PER

    Contact information

    Lebanon: Joelle Bassoul, Syria Response Media Advisor, Oxfam, jbassoul@oxfam.org.uk, +961-71525218

    Jordan: Karl Schembri, Regional Media Manager, Save the Children, karl.schembri@savethechildren.org, +962 (0) 7902 20159

    US: Oliver Money, Media Relations, International Rescue Committee, oliver.money@rescue.org, +1-646 318 7307

    UK: Sara Hashash, MENA Press Officer, Amnesty International, Sara.hashash@amnesty.org, + 44 (0) 20 7413 5511


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    Source: Danish Refugee Council, ACTED, UN Population Fund, Islamic Relief, International Organization for Migration, International Relief and Development, Norwegian Refugee Council, INTERSOS, CARE, UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, Terre des hommes, World Food Programme, Mercy Corps, UN Children's Fund, International Catholic Migration Commission, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, International Medical Corps, Un Ponte per, Save the Children, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, World Vision, Terre des Hommes Italia, UN Women, Première Urgence Internationale, Jordan Health Aid Society
    Country: Jordan

    Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA)

    Sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) violates universally recognized international legal norms and standards and has always been unacceptable behavior and prohibited conduct for humanitarian workers. It brings harm to those whom the UN and humanitarian agencies are mandated to protect, and jeopardizes the reputation of these agencies and their ability to provide protection.

    Sexual exploitation and abuse is not a new phenomenon. In 2001, the UNHCR/Save the Children assessment1 highlighted how international and national aid workers, working for Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and United Nations (UN) agencies were perpetrators of gross misconduct in West African refugee camps. The aid workers abused their roles as decision-makers and their positions of trust, to sexually exploit and abuse beneficiary populations. Humanitarian workers traded items, as seemingly insignificant as biscuits, in exchange for sex with women and children.

    The shocking findings of the assessment highlighted both the vulnerability of such populations and that humanitarian and development agencies have an obligation to put in place organisational and programmatic systems that protect those we serve, and that we do not inadvertently recruit potential perpetrators. It also highlighted that we need to put in place complaints mechanisms so that alleged cases can be raised and reported; investigated; and, where necessary, referred to the authorities where a crime is suspected.

    The findings resulted in the establishment of the Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Taskforce on Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA), which advised the UN on specific measures and adopted six standards of behaviour (core principles) to be included in the UN Secretary General’s Bulletin: Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) (SGB)2 (Annex I) which is based on the UN’s Code of Conduct and applies to all UN Staff, partners and contractors. As a further expression of intent and will to act, the Statement of Commitment on Eliminating Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN and Non-UN Personnel (2006)3 (Annex II), is endorsed by 42 UN agencies and 36 Non-UN entities (as of 2008), binding all signatories to the Core Principles and prevention measures as outlined in the SGB.

    Despite efforts to establish systems and mechanisms to facilitate reports, underreporting of sexual exploitation and abuse remains a challenge for the humanitarian community. Several reports researching the issue (i.e. No One To Turn To, 20084; To Complain or Not To Complain, 20105) have concluded that sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarian personnel is chronically underreported. Several factors explain this including: fear of losing muchneeded material assistance; fear of stigmatization; the threat of retribution or retaliation; the lack of knowledge on how to report an allegation of sexual exploitation and abuse; vulnerable groups feeling powerless to report an abuse; lack of effective legal services to which cases of abuse can be reported; lack of faith in the response that an allegation of sexual abuse would receive; cultural barriers to reporting sexual exploitation and abuse; fear of the consequences of mandatory reporting requirements and lack of maintaining confidentiality.


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    Source: Catholic Agency for Overseas Development, Danish Refugee Council, Trócaire, Lutheran World Federation, CARE, Christian Aid, Mercy Corps, Médecins du Monde, Solidarités International, Oxfam, International Rescue Committee, HelpAge International, Save the Children, World Vision, Diakonia Sweden, Dorcas Aid International, Terre des Hommes Italia, Secours Islamique France, Finn Church Aid, Première Urgence Internationale
    Country: Jordan, Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey

    Refugees face similar challenges across Syria’s neighbouring countries

    Refugees face similar challenges across Syria’s neighbouring countries, a new report by a coalition of 28 NGOs has found, warning that long-term efforts are still needed by the international community and host governments.

    Released against the backdrop of the “Supporting Syrians and the Region Conference” in Helsinki, slated for January 24, the report looked at changes in the legal status, education and jobs conditions of Syrians in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon one year after the London conference, which presented a “comprehensive new approach” to addressing the protracted Syrian crisis in February 2016.

    “We urge the international community to ensure that the generous commitments made last year mark a new era of collaboration, solidarity and responsibility sharing to respond to the needs of Syrian refugees, internally displaced and host communities,” says Gerry Garvey, Regional Director for the Danish Refugee Council in Middle East and North Africa.

    Since the beginning of the conflict, more than 4.8 million have fled Syria to its neighbouring countries, while UN numbers show more than 9 million inside Syria in urgent need of assistance. At last year’s conference, donors committed to longer term funding while host governments committed to significant policy changes. The new report from the Danish Refugee Council (DRC) and 27 other organisations takes stock of the progress on these commitments.

    “While important steps have been taken, much more remains unaccomplished — not least when it comes to witnessing a measurable and sustainable impact on people’s lives. There is a continued need for more predictable and equitable responsibility sharing for refugees,” Gerry Garvey says.

    Relevant government actors, UN, INGOs and Syrian NGOs will meet in Helsinki to follow up on the situation for Syrian refugees in the region. At the London conference, donors had pledged $6 billion for 2016. By September 2016, over $6.3 billion had been committed in grants for 2016, exceeding pledges by 5%. However, there is still room for progress. One of the aspirations of the London conference was to generate long-term funding commitments. While $6.1 billion was pledged for 2017-2020, currently only $607.9 million has been committed.

    “One of the successes of the London Conference was the recognition that humanitarian aid alone is not an adequate response to the massive crisis inside Syria and the strains placed on refugee hosting countries. But at the same time, we've seen an increasingly restrictive environment for refugees emerge across many countries since the London Conference, including in Europe and the US. Globally, we currently witness a lack of resettlement opportunities. And with continued closed borders of many of the neighbouring countries, this is part of a global situation where Syrians risk being caught inside their war torn homeland,” says Gerry Garvey

    Read the report here

    The Danish Refugee Council is one of the largest organisations working with the Syrian displaced. With multi-sector programmes covering both humanitarian and development needs inside Syria as well as neighbouring countries, including Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Turkey, DRC is a central actor in the response to the protracted Syrian crisis. DRC Secretary General, Andreas Kamm and Regional Director for MENA; Gerry Garvey will participate in the Helsinki conference.